A Theology of Sleep

Andy Naselli —  November 25, 2014 — Leave a comment

Sweet sleep is a gift from God: “when you lie down, your sleep will be sweet” (Proverbs 3:24b).

I agree with John Piper and Don Carson on sleep:

  1. John Piper: “For me, adequate sleep is not just a matter of staying healthy. It’s a matter of staying in the ministry” (p. 189).
  2. Don Carson: “Doubt may be fostered by sleep deprivation. If you keep burning the candle at both ends, sooner or later you will indulge in more and more mean cynicism—and the line between cynicism and doubt is a very thin one. Of course, different individuals require different numbers of hours of sleep: moreover, some cope with a bit of tiredness better than others. Nevertheless, if you are among those who become nasty, cynical, or even full of doubt when you are missing your sleep, you are morally obligated to try to get the sleep you need. We are whole, complicated beings; our physical existence is tied to our spiritual well-being, to our mental outlook, to our relationships with others, including our relationship with God. Sometimes the godliest thing you can do in the universe is get a good night’s sleep—not pray all night, but sleep. I’m certainly not denying that there may be a place for praying all night; I’m merely insisting that in the normal course of things, spiritual discipline obligates you get the sleep your body need” (p. 147)

sleepSo I was delighted to read this book: Continue Reading…

A Theology of Heaven

Andy Naselli —  November 18, 2014 — Leave a comment

heavenChris Morgan and Robert Peterson did it again. They’ve successfully addressed an important topic with a theological method that grounds its systematic and practical theology in exegesis and biblical theology (and historical theology informs it).

Christopher W.Morgan and Robert A. Peterson, eds. Heaven. Theology in Community. Wheaton: Crossway, 2014.

Look inside here to see the contributors in the Table of Contents.

Related:

  1. My interview with Chris Morgan on the theology of James
  2. My interview with Chris Morgan on the glory of God

EdwardsThe title of this book’s final chapter is “Four Criticisms”:

Dane C. Ortlund. Edwards on the Christian Life: Alive to the Beauty of God. Theologians on the Christian Life. Wheaton: Crossway, 2014.

Ortlund qualifies,

Jonathan Edwards is way out ahead of me, and probably you, both in living and in theologizing on the Christian life. But the student, standing on the teacher’s shoulders, may on occasion glimpse something the teacher doesn’t. Cautiously, we proceed. (p. 178)

Ortlund unpacks four criticisms (my paraphrases): Continue Reading…

churchI just reviewed this book for 9Marks:

Christopher W. Morgan and Kendell H. Easley, eds. The Community of Jesus: A Theology of the Church. Nashville: Broadman & Holman, 2013. 288 pp. 10-page sample PDF.

Excerpt:

When you have a solid grasp of how a theme develops across the Bible’s storyline in Scripture, you are able to trace that theme from a number of starting points. For example, you may be preaching or teaching through the Gospel of John and come to John 2:19: “Destroy this temple, and in three days I will raise it up.” You may then zoom out so that you can trace the trajectory of the temple theme across the Bible’s storyline—from Eden, to the tabernacle, to Solomon’s temple, to Ezekiel’s temple, to Zerubbabel’s temple, to Jesus as the temple, to the tearing of the temple’s curtain, to the church as the temple, to the individual Christian’s body as the temple, to the heavenly temple, and all the way to its culmination in Rev 21:22: “I saw no temple in the city, for its temple is the Lord God the Almighty and the Lamb.” Then you could zoom back in to John 2 and reflect on the significance of that passage in light of how it fits in the trajectory from Eden to the new heavens and new earth.

Logos 6 Releases Today

Andy Naselli —  October 27, 2014 — 9 Comments

Here’s what’s new in Logos 6:

I’ve been using Logos 6 each day for the last few weeks, and it’s a beautiful design. It has some new bells and whistles, but by far my favorite new feature is that you can hide all the chapter and verse numbers in Bibles—whether Hebrew, Greek, or English. I love this feature! (I explain why here and here.)

You can learn more about Logos 6 here (note the coupon code for 15% off) and here.

libraryI recently discovered that Southern Seminary makes available free PDFs of many of the PhD dissertations (and some ThM theses) that students have successfully defended there.

These students have spent years working on these treatises, and some of the theses are outstanding (e.g., David Schrock’s on definite atonement).

I wish more schools did this. I just added over 70 of these PDFs to my Zotero library.

CNTTSI just happily added The Center for New Testament Textual Studies NT Critical Apparatus to my Logos library.

From the resource’s introduction: Continue Reading…