Archives For Practical Theology

boundsWayne Grudem, “Why, When, and for What Should We Draw New Boundaries?” in Beyond the Bounds: Open Theism and the Undermining of Biblical Christianity [free PDF] (ed. John Piper, Justin Taylor, and Paul Kjoss Helseth; Wheaton: Crossway, 2003), 369 (numbering added):

Some wrong questions to ask

It is important to add that there are some questions that should not be part of our consideration in deciding which doctrinal matters to exclude with new boundaries. These are questions such as the following:

    1. Are the advocates my friends?
    2. Are they nice people?
    3. Will we lose money or members if we exclude them?
    4. Will the academic community criticize us as being too narrow-minded?
    5. Will someone take us to court over this?

Such questions are all grounded in a wrongful fear of man, not in a fear of God and trust in God.

tocC. Ben Mitchell, Ethics and Moral Reasoning: A Student’s Guide (Reclaiming the Christian Intellectual Tradition; Wheaton: Crossway, 2013), 95–96:

Below is a suggested procedure for finding ethical guidance from the Bible: Continue Reading…

Two quotes from John Piper:

1. ”How Shall People Be Saved? Part 1,” a sermon preached to Bethlehem Baptist Church on June 1, 2003 (transcript of the audio from 12:22 to 12:51; not in the manuscript):

There are a lot of women—probably some in this church—who spend a lot of time on their hair and a lot of time on their eyes and a lot of time on their lips and a lot of time on their clothes and their feet and don’t spend any time on becoming beautiful. . . . This [i.e., Rom 10:13–21] is a text about what makes a person beautiful.

2. ”Her Body, Her Self, and Her God,” Taste & See, October 28, 1997:

Expressing God, not self, is what a godly woman wants to do. Excessive preoccupation with figure and hair and complexion is a sign that self, not God, has moved to the center. With God at the center—like the “sun,” satisfying a woman’s longings for beauty and greatness and truth and love—all the “planets” of food and dress and exercise and cosmetics and posture and countenance will stay in their proper orbit.

One of my prayers: “Lord, may my three daughters grow up to be as beautiful as their mother.”

Related:

  1. John Piper, “Feminine Beauty in God’s Eyes,” Ask Pastor John, Episode 268, January 31, 2014.
  2. True Beauty

How to Grade Papers

Andy Naselli —  April 3, 2014 — 3 Comments

Mark Boda prepared this rubric for grading written assignments:

grading

Grading papers is obviously more subjective than grading multiple choice or true/false, and Boda’s criteria help make the process a little more objective.

tocThe table is from p. 87 of this book:

Stanley E. Porter, ed. Those Who Can, Teach: Teaching as Christian Vocation. McMaster General Series 3. Eugene, OR: Pickwick, 2013.

Just because a person earned a PhD doesn’t mean that they can teach well. (Many of us have painful personal anecdotes from our experiences as students!) Continue Reading…

True Beauty

Andy Naselli —  March 27, 2014 — 1 Comment

trueSix years ago my wife recommended three books by Carolyn Mahaney and her daughters.

At the end of this month another one releases:

Carolyn Mahaney and Nicole Whitacre. True Beauty. Wheaton: Crossway, 2014. 125 pp. 22-page PDF sample.

This book is for ladies, but I read it because I love and lead my wife and three little daughters. This is going to become an increasingly big deal as my daughters get older, and I want to shepherd them well. Continue Reading…

essentialsI love Mark Dever’s resources on the church, so I’m not sure why I don’t recall hearing about Church Essentials, which Lifeway published in 2012.

The Leader Kit includes two DVDs, which feature six thoughtful interviews with Mark Dever. Mark is incredibly gifted at speaking off-the-cuff clearly, directly, wisely, and winsomely.

DVD contents:

Continue Reading…

Pain_SufferingI read this one slowly because it’s so rich:

Timothy Keller. Walking with God through Pain and Suffering. New York: Dutton, 2013. 12-page PDF sample.

It’s probably the best overall book on suffering because it shrewdly addresses the issue from three angles:

  1. cultural
  2. biblical-theological
  3. practical

As with Keller’s other books, this brims with wisdom from decades of fruitful pastoral ministry. Continue Reading…